Woman arrested for credit card fraud at Union Square

A 26-year-old woman had just stepped out from the Starbucks, using a forged credit card to receive gift cards, when anti-crime officers stopped her and arrested for credit card fraud after she was entering through an emergency exit at Union Square subway station in New York without paying.

A 26-year-old woman had just stepped out from the Starbucks, using a forged credit card to receive gift cards, when anti-crime officers stopped her and arrested for credit card fraud after she was entering through an emergency exit at Union Square subway station in New York without paying.

The woman initially did not provide identification when Police officer’s Mariano and Reyes stopped her for failure to pay the subway fare at Union Square. Then she showed an ID card to officers and claimed that is she pictured on the ID, while it bore no resemblance to her. According to NYPD News.

After her arrest, the anti-crime team discovered a laptop and credit card skimmer device.The anti-crime officers also investigated the closest Starbucks after uncovering the cards and determined that she had received them with a fraudulent credit card.

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The woman was charged with grand larceny, criminal possession of stolen property, identity theft, theft of service, possession of a forged instrument, possession of a skimmer device and criminal trespass.

Although the NYPD officers initially stopped the woman from entering the subway Union Square station without paying, Sgt. Jasmin said that many theft-of-service arrests often discover more crimes, and helping to keep the subways safe.

A 26-year-old woman had just stepped out from the Starbucks, using a forged credit card to receive gift cards, when anti-crime officers stopped her and arrested for credit card fraud after she was entering through an emergency exit at Union Square subway station in New York without paying.

Credit card fraud and identity theft is the worst crime for the past few years. Credit card fraud is the unauthorized use of a credit or debit card, or similar payment tool, to fraudulently obtain money or property. Credit or debit card numbers can be stolen from unsecured websites or can be stolen in an identity theft scheme. For more additional information visit the FBI’s identity theft website.

FBI tips for avoiding credit card fraud:

  • Don’t give out your card number online unless the website is secure and reputable. Sometimes a tiny icon of a green padlock appears to symbolize a higher level of security to transmit data. That icon is not a guarantee of a secure website but provides some assurance.
  • Never trust a website just because it claims to be secure.
  • Before using the website, check out the encryption security software it uses.
  • Make sure you are purchasing merchandise from a trusted source.
  • Complete your homework on the company or individual to make sure that they are legitimate.
    Check and obtain a physical address rather than simply a P.O Box and a phone number, and call the vendor to see if the phone number is correct and working.
  • Send an email to the vendor to make sure the email address is active, and be wary of those that utilize free email service where a payment wasn’t required to open the email account.
  • Consider not purchasing from vendors if they don’t provide with this type of information.
  • Check with the BBB (Better Business Bureau) from the vendor’s area.
  • Be cautious when responding to some or special investment offers, especially through unknown or unsolicited emails.
  • Be cautious when dealing with vendors from outside your town or country.
  • If possible, purchase items online using your credit card. You can always dispute the transaction if something goes wrong.
  • Make sure the purchase transaction is secure when you electronically send your credit or debit card number.
  • Keep the list of all your cards and account information together with the card issuer’s contact information. If anything suspicious or you lose your card, contact the bank credit card issuer immediately.