Russian online narcotics dark web market shut down

Russian authorities have put the final nail in the coffin of the country’s largest online narcotics dark web market, known as

Russian authorities have put the final nail in the coffin of the country’s largest online narcotics dark web market, known as “RAMP” or “The Russian Anonymous Marketplace” operating through the Tor anonymous network. According to TASS.

RAMP or The Russian Anonymous Marketplace is a Russian language forum with users selling a variety of drugs, guns or computer hacking tools on the Dark Web. With over 15,000 members, the site uses Tor and uses some escrow features like other platforms Silk Road or AlphaBay.

A difference from other platforms, the transactions is not on the site, the dealer and buyer only find each other on RAMP, and then discuss the details of the deal in the chat Off-the-Record Messaging. Payment is made using Bitcoin or QIWI trough the site, and the goods are sent to the buyer address or hide in caches.

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The admin of the website aka “Darkside,” claims that they avoid attention from law enforcement due to its prevailing Russian user base and its ban on the sale of merchandise and services such as narcotics, weapons, child pornography or hacking.

“The activity of the RAMP trade platform was seized and shut down in July 2017 as a result of operations,” Deputy Russian Interior Minister Mikhail Vanichkin said in a letter sent upon the request of Russian MP Anton Gorelkin.

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RAMP had operated for more than five years in the so-called Dark Web, which is unavailable for regular internet users. The police operation was launched after a series of high-profile media publications revealed the commercial scale of this illegal online narcotics dark web market.

Throughout the first six months of 2017, more than 3,775 drug-related crimes committed with the use of Internet technologies were detected, and 1,583 individuals were held criminally liable. More than 760 kg of drugs were seized, and 1,345 Internet resources that had been used for selling drugs in Russia were shut down.