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Man wanted for 1989 drug smuggling arrested when trying to enter U.S. from Canada

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A U.S. citizen man wanted on charges related to a large-scale drug smuggling operation was arrested by border patrol when he tried to enter the U.S. from Canada after 30 years on the run.

A U.S. citizen man wanted on charges related to a large-scale drug smuggling operation was arrested by border patrol when he tried to enter the U.S. from Canada after 30 years on the run.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection said that officers responded to an April 15, 2018 report of two suspicious individuals emerging from the trees about a quarter mile from the U.S.-Canada border in Montana, according to FOX News.

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The two men were detained, and after some questioning, officers learned one of the men, Jacob Moritz, was a naturalized U.S. citizen with an outstanding arrest warrant dating to 1989.

According to U.S. Customs, the arrest warrant against Moritz stems from a 1989 indictment charging him and others with various counts related to a large-scale drug smuggling operation. Officials said Moritz used an ocean-going freighter to smuggle large quantities of marijuana, hashish, and heroin into the U.S. between 1970 until his arrest in 1989.

At the time of the indictment, Moritz fled the United States.

“This is another example of our officers doing their job to protect our country from those who are here to conduct illegal activities,” U.S. Customs Patrol Agent in Charge Paul Farmer said in a statement. “It should also be known that Moritz was uncooperative during questioning.

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However, that will never stop us from finding out who you are or what you have done in your past. If that includes conducting criminal activities 30 years ago, you will be turned over to the proper authorities and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the U.S. law.

Mortiz was charged for drug smuggling and turned over to the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, and the U.S. Marshals later took him into custody.

The man who attempted to enter the U.S. with Moritz was only identified as being a Canadian citizen. U.S. Customs agents began the process for his removal.

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Drugs

Mexican federal police commander enters no contest plea to obstructing U.S. investigation into drug cartel

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A former high-ranking commander in the Mexican federal police entered a no contest plea in U.S. District Court to the charges of obstruction of justice and conspiring with others to corruptly impede a U.S.-based narcotics trafficking investigation.

A former high-ranking commander in the Mexican federal police entered a no contest plea in U.S. District Court to the charges of obstruction of justice and conspiring with others to corruptly impede a U.S. based narcotics trafficking investigation.

A no contest plea is one in which a defendant acknowledges that the facts of the case would result in a verdict of guilt, although the defendant is not admitting to those facts, according to U.S. Attorney’s Office.

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Ivan Reyes Arzate, 46, of Mexico City, also known as “La Reina,” entered a no contest plea to charges that he obstructed and conspired to obstruct an investigation being carried out by the DEA. Reyes acquired information regarding the U.S. investigation through his position as a commander in the Mexican federal police, which was working with the DEA and the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Chicago to investigate an international drug trafficking and money laundering organization.



An indictment was returned in July 2017 charging Reyes, and he has been in custody since the announcement of the charges. U.S. District Judge Amy St. Eve accepted the plea and set the sentencing for August 29, 2018.

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The obstruction of justice charge carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. The conspiracy charge carries a maximum sentence of 5 years in prison. The Court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal statutes and the advisory U.S. Sentencing Guidelines.

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Missouri state prison officials trying down to stop drug overdoses

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Missouri state prison officials are working to stem the flow of contraband after multiple drug overdoses, including a few that were deadly.

Missouri state prison officials are working to stem the flow of contraband after multiple drug overdoses, including a few that were deadly.

The Missouri Department of Corrections began tracking after inmates began overdosing in administrative segregation, which is one of the most secure and isolated parts of the prison. Over the next nine months, there were 146 drug overdoses spread throughout the state prison system, with multiple drugs to blame, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

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Three inmates died from opioids, including Nicholas Pickett. The 25-year-old had cocaine in his system, but an autopsy blamed his May 2017 death at the Moberly Correctional Center on the painkiller fentanyl.

Pickett’s father, Chris Pickett, said there needs to be better surveillance and higher standards for prison employees, whom, he says, don’t undergo the same searches as visitors. While it’s unclear where the drugs came from that killed his son, he cited the case of a corrections officer in Moberly who was arrested three months prior for having 40 capsules of heroin and other drugs. AP News reported.

“My son died, and he shouldn’t have died,” said Pickett, whose son was five years into a 14-year sentence for robbery and possession of a controlled substance. The autopsy found track marks between his son’s toes and on his left arm. Surveillance video also showed suspicious activity around his cell before he was found unresponsive inside.

Missouri state prison spokeswoman Karen Pojmann said overdoses are a priority issue for director Anne Precythe. In May, when the department began tracking them, Precythe called for more thorough contraband searches. The corrections department also is re-evaluating procedures designed to prevent staff from smuggling narcotics.

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Pojmann said opioids are particularly problematic. Some have tried to hide the drugs in the glue flaps of envelopes and under stamps. Food visits for offenders with good behavior have been temporarily suspended because visitors were trying to smuggle drugs in that way, a clampdown that has hit offender morale.

“There is a big problem with opioids because they are available in such small and potent dosages,” Pojmann said. “We have to be vigilant and go over everything with a fine-toothed comb. It’s a challenge.”

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Ex-London drug dealer tells how his life turned to crime

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Quince Garcia a former south London drug dealer reveals in a candid interview with the Evening Standard how he "gave up the game" and left life on a London estate behind.

Quince Garcia a former south London drug dealer reveals in a candid interview with the Evening Standard how he “gave up the game” and left life on a London estate behind.

“I was a young boy with no self esteem, no confidence, I felt like community didn’t want me.”

These are the words of Quince Garcia, 39, who at 18 years old became a drug-dealer on London’s streets twenty years ago.

It was the birth of his second child at 28 made him want to turn his life around.

The father of three kids who was raised on an estate in south London, in the 80s has candidly revealed to the Standard what enabled him to turn his life around after three stints in jail.

His former life of crime involved selling drugs, guns and carrying out burglaries, he said.

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Garcia made repeated attempts to alter his life including attending college and getting a part-time job, but it wasn’t until he had a mental episode at University that he felt he was able to pursue his ambitions of a career in film industry.

“My father was in prison a lot; my mother brought us up mainly on her own, She tried really hard,” he said.

Ex-London drug dealer continued: “I felt like I wasn’t on the smart side of community I knew that my life was going to be one where I had to find a way out of being poor.”

After committing minor burglaries in his youth, Garcia began selling narcotics shortly after he left high-school.

At the age of 17, Garcia started selling marijuana on Camberwell’s Vestry Estate and says he couldn’t see any options for himself.

“I didn’t feel capable of doing a job that I really wanted to do. I didn’t feel like community wanted me,” he said.



After 3 months of selling weed, Garcia moved onto selling crack cocaine after he was approached by an older drug dealer.

“He told me, I knew that you were going to be the person to deal with me. He gave me his phone with all his contacts.

“I was a young boy with no self-esteem, no confidence but I was gaining false confidence by gaining money and feeling secure with money. I had an ego that made me feel untouchable,” he continued.

Ex-London drug dealer sold narcotics for ten years. During that time he went to prison twice for illegal driving and a third time for drug possession with an intent to sell.

Recalling the exact moment he decided he wanted to leave “the game” behind, he said: “There was a man in his thirties who used to patrol the area. I remember looking at him and thinking there’s no way I want to be like him when I’m going to be 30.

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“Still talking about narcotics, still selling drugs and living in this estate.”

Garcia began taking classes and eventually attended college in Westminster and Lewisham while continuing to sell drugs.

In 2004 he was arrested for the third time and sentenced to two and a half years in jail.

After serving over a year of his sentence, he left jail and did not return to dealing.

“I said to myself what am I going to do to ensure it doesn’t happen again?”

During his time in prison, Garcia began writing a screenplay based on his own experiences.

At the age of 28, Ex-London drug dealer attended University of East London and achieved a degree in film production and animation.

After school, he set up his own business called Road Works Media funded by the Prince’s Trust which aimed to provide workshops for youths looking to get into employment.



Speaking at schools and businesses in London Garcia talked to young people about his own experiences.

“I spoke to them about not being scared of failure and how important it is to be fearless,” he said.

Students who enrolled in the workshops took part in a three-month programme which included CV training and cognitive behavioral therapy and ultimately ended in finding employment.

He explained how a lot of young people find it difficult to communicate how they are feeling.

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Ex-London drug dealer said that he believed the therapy was the most important aspect of the course as mental health issues in deprived areas are often overlooked.

During his time at school, Garcia experienced a mental episode himself which resulted in him spending ten days in a mental institution.

“I started to realize that I was behaving in a certain way and I was so angry,” he said.

“I had a nervous breakdown, and it was contributed by a lot of stuff I had done in the past and a lot of things that I was dealing with which I had repressed.

“That was the moment I broke down an old coping mechanism which was built on false securities and self imposed conditions and narrow-mindedness. Once I realized that I realized my mental health needed to be rebuilt.”

Now Garcia is a presenter and producer with production company Underworld TV and is currently working towards producing his own film about Southwark’s first black mayor Sam Beaver King.

He has already received funding from Southwark Council and aims to train 3 young people in film production in the process of making the movie.

Garcia said he hopes he can continue to produce films and provide you people with film training.

“It’s about taking these people under your wind and providing them with skills and networking opportunities to make them believe that they are a part of a community,” he said.

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